Bánh bột chiên chay

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Bánh bột cừu chay (translated to lớn English as Vegan Vietnamese Fried Rice Cake) is a super delicious street food in Vietnam that I ate a lot for breakfast growing up. It’s typically super oily, super savoury, và full of fun texture.

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I’ve been wanting to giới thiệu this Bánh bột cừu chay recipe for a very long time, but it’s been a bit intimidating for me for a while. My family is notorious for cooking without a recipe: they simply cook based on feeling và texture & while I can vị that sometimes & get delicious results, it’s often not as consistent as my grandmother or mother does it. I don’t really know how they manage to vị it so well, but I guess I still have a lot to learn!

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There are actually a lot of pre-measured packets of this mixture at the grocery store, mostly just telling you to địa chỉ cửa hàng water & oil, but in case you prefer lớn measure it out yourself or don’t have access to lớn the pre-measured mixes, this recipe is for you! My grandma uses a recipe that has significantly less tapioca starch in it, but I find that the tapioca adds a really lovely bounciness to lớn the steamed rice cake that yields a really tasty texture that isn’t quite as starchy.

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There are a few recipes I see online that have different methods that I find a little tedious. Some say to lớn sift the flours together, some say to showroom 2/3 of the water as cold, then the final 1/3 water as boiling hot. I’ve seen some recipes that tell you khổng lồ microwave it và stir in intervals to lớn cook the mixture through, but I’ve made this as lazy as possible from my experience of watching my family cook this (granted, it’s been a while since I saw the whole process start khổng lồ finish).

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Since testing it in my bột cừu chay YouTube video, I’ve just mixed everything directly into the pot, using a whisk to make sure everything is totally incorporated. Then switching lớn a silicone spoon, you have khổng lồ stir it over the heat until it thickens. You want it khổng lồ be a thick, pancake batter, but not so thick that it’s “glompy”. You want thick và gloopy, but not glompy. Does that make sense..?

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In any case, I found steaming khổng lồ be the most hassle-free way to lớn cook this (none of this microwave nonsense, not that I have anything against microwaves, this just seems really cumbersome). Steaming it for 45 minutes cooks the cake through và then you simple cover và refrigerate this until the next morning, when you can fry it up for breakfast!

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Now I don’t know if this is still something people eat for breakfast, I assume it is, but I remember on the weekends when I didn’t have to lớn wake up super early for school (I went to lớn school in Vietnam for lượt thích a month when I was 7), I would ride on the motorbikes with my grandpa và my mom khổng lồ a street vendor, và we’d sit on those super sketchy plastic chairs about a foot off the ground and eat a very oily plate of this delicious, savoury concoction.

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Bánh bột rán typically uses a lot of oil to fry up these little golden cubes, then is bound with 1-2 eggs và topped with green onions & a dash of a specific soy sauce. The soy sauce I would see a lot was mostly a soy + sugar + water mixture, but I always have my nuoc mam cham chay recipe in my fridge so I tend lớn prefer using this is a tastier & (funkier) version of that sauce.

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Eating bột rán chay always kind of brings me back to lớn the sounds of motorbikes honking và whizzing by, and using these little appetizer picks khổng lồ spear tender chunks of egg stuck to these crispy and chewy squares. I’m so thankful that we have vegan options for eggs that yield such a nostalgic & similar texture. I hope you try out this recipe and enjoy this veganized Vietnamese street food!